Are you in a situation like this? Your work was exciting when you started this job, but the shine has worn off over time. You’re bored. It’s a good paying job with a good company. You like your manager and the people with whom you work. But that doesn’t make the work any less boring. Should you start looking for another job?

Changing jobs isn’t your only choice. There’s no guarantee that you won’t experience the same kind of boredom after a short time at a new job. But that doesn’t mean you should settle for boredom either. Boredom with your work should be a signal that you need to engage in some self-reflection and make some changes. Here’s what you can do:

Join us on this week’s podcast as we look back at key takeaways on the priorities and strategies of managers who make a meaningful difference in the lives of the people they lead.

Cultivate Positive Relationships

Relationships are the foundation for everything managers do, and individualized relationships are the key to managing to make a difference. We’re hitting key points in this week’s podcast. Dive deeper with these specific podcasts from earlier in the year:

We need to change the way we think about change.

The pace of change in our society and in the workplace continues to accelerate. Change itself is becoming a constant. Yet, too often, we behave as if change is something that happens occasionally and needs to be managed temporarily with the goal of achieving stasis or a “new normal.”

Managers who make a difference approach change as an ongoing reality. They embrace uncertainty, approach it with confidence and instill hope in others. They welcome suggestions. And they don’t expect to get 100% buy in. Does that last part surprise you?

Technology recruiting is some of the most challenging work in the recruiting industry. A lot of technology candidates won’t even reply to an email or take a phone call from someone they don’t know personally. With unemployment hitting historically low rates, this challenge will only grow. Getting good technology talent in the front door is hard, and losing technology talent is expensive, with the cost of turnover estimated at 6-9 months of salary. If you’re smart, you’ll be figuring out how to keep the back door tightly closed.

The movie, “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape,” starring Johnnie Depp as Gilbert and Leonardo DiCaprio as Arnie, is an excellent analogy to executive coaching. As executive coaches, it is vital to understand that to help or coach someone, one must have the precise ability to be helpful for the leader to be coached. In this movie, the oldest sibling, Gilbert, struggles to help his bedridden mother and mentally challenged younger brother, Arnie. After the father, Mr. Grape, commits suicide, Gilbert becomes the patriarch, surrounded by family members with situations beyond his control. What’s eating Gilbert mostly relates to Gilbert’s growing frustration caused by his inability to help his mother overcome her morbidly obese condition.

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