Moral authority is not discussed very frequently, but lately we’ve heard a lot of talk about it, particularly in relation to President Trump. Does he have it? Is he losing it? Does it even matter? This post, however, is not about Donald Trump. It is about why people want their leaders to have moral authority, and by extension, why you should strive to earn it.

Consider the responses of three people laying bricks. When asked, “What are you doing?”

The first person replies, “I’m laying bricks.”

The second person says, “I’m part of a team building a large, intricate brick wall that requires great skill.”

To that same question, the third person replies, “I’m just one of many people working together here to build a cathedral where people will get married, christen their babies and lay their loved ones to rest.”

Before you embark on developing your management skills, begin by thinking about why you want a career in management. Unfortunately, there’s a widespread point of view that unless you get promoted into management, something is wrong. You’re not progressing in your career. That point of view reveals a lack of wisdom.

A recent SHRM survey found that filling a vacant position takes an average of 42 days and costs and average of over $4,100 dollars. That works out to about $100 a day.

What if you could transfer most or all of that cost to your bottom line? How would that change your financial results as a manager or leader? And how would it change the quality of your team’s overall performance if you had great candidates waiting in the wings every time someone on your team left for one reason or another? What if you could cut those 42 days by 50%...or more?

When someone leaves, I’m always surprised when I encounter indifference (or worse) on the part of that person’s direct supervisor. The “or worse” part is when the supervisor blames the employee. I’ve seen this so often that I absolutely should not be surprised. But I am – I guess because I’m disappointed with that attitude. I guess I take that as a sign that the supervisor doesn’t really care all that much. It bothers me.

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