For very good reasons we invest a lot of time in group meetings, but we need to recognize that the most important, powerful and meaningful meetings are one-on-one. You can verify this insight by thinking about your life experience. For instance, think about how you close a sale or develop future leaders through mentoring. Think about the last conference you attended. Did you derive more value from the keynotes and breakouts or from people you met at the conference? Think about how things get done in your organization, or in your life.

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Last week I attended a board of advisers meeting at a prestigious university, which has a highly regarded four-year program to prepare students for careers in a particular industry. The members of the advisory board are all executives in businesses related to that industry. Approximately 25 executives attended this conference. It was readily apparent to me that each member had a sincere desire to improve both the university’s program and also to improve the ability of the industry to serve its customers. And they were committed to constructive collaboration in order to achieve these goals.

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When hiring salespeople, it can be tempting to look at the sales performance of the candidate and jump to the conclusion that he or she will be a good fit for your current team. It is also tempting to conclude that a person with a charming personality may quickly learn the process and know-how and be competent in the job.

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A client asked one of my associates what a senior leader should do when she finds in her organization a team of highly talented employees being supervised by a weak supervisor. Furthermore, what can the team members do?

Let’s talk about some options available to the senior leader. In all cases, the very first activity for the leader should be root cause analysis. Why is this supervisor so weak?

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At Talent Plus we strive to make people’s lives easier. We know when you select the very best people into your organization, you will gain rewards beyond measure and see the benefits not only in the immediate future, but in years to come as well. It’s a natural outpouring of good progress. Find a solution that moves you forward and it inevitably motivates everyone in your organization to become innovators themselves, often finding new ways to add value to their client base and become more efficient and effective as an organization. That’s teamwork at its best.

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My associate, Jessica McMullen, brought to my attention a thoughtful, well-written article by Lindsey Dunn entitled, “Mentoring is Critical to Organizational Longevity — So Why Is It Such a Struggle?” , “… great mentorship requires two broad things: demonstrating great leadership so that others can learn from your behavior, and championing others.” In this post I add my thoughts about great mentors and what you can do to foster more and better mentoring in your organization.

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