“Before he can become a [insert desired role here] he has to pay is dues, just like I did.” Have you heard this point of view? I’ve heard it my entire career. It’s high time to evolve our thinking, to leave this point of view behind.

The phraseology indicates that the dues-paying activities are a sort of penance — nothing more than a cost to the employee of pursuing a particular career goal. If a person isn’t willing to go through this experience they’re not worthy. They don’t want it enough. This reminds me of fraternity initiations.

.

Read more ...

This post is third in a series that started with debunking the myth that Millennials are job hoppers. The post that followed dug deeper into what Millennials are looking for from their employers. This post draws from both of those posts to offer specific coaching strategies for Millennials.

.

Read more ...

Last week I posted data debunking the myth of Millennials as promiscuous job hoppers as compared with previous generations. On average, 20-24 year olds stay in their jobs about 1.5 years and 25-34 year olds stick for about 3 years, and those numbers have remained consistent over the past three decades. (Click here for the full article.)

.

Read more ...

As a leader you’re responsible to help your direct reports improve their performance. A big part of that involves coaching. Unfortunately, the term “coaching” has taken on a negative connotation in many organizations. To mention that a person is receiving “coaching and counseling” is, sadly, not a good thing. That’s because “coaching and counseling” is now a euphemism for “disciplinary action”. This post is not about how to discipline.

.

Read more ...

A client called me last week to talk about Millennials and turnover. Turnover has tripled over where it was a decade ago for their entry-level management positions, which are typically held by people under 35. They’re trying to figure out how to stop the bleeding.

One of the first questions we discussed was, “Is it just this generation?”

This statistic captures the current consensus about Millennials and suggests that the answer is a resounding YES:

91% of Millennials expect to stay in a job for less than 3 years.

.

Read more ...

SCROLL TO TOP