How Do You Tell Someone They Didn’t Get The Job?

How Do You Tell Someone They Didn’t Get The Job?

This question comes up repeatedly, especially with new managers and supervisors. Few people enjoy delivering bad news, so some people try to avoid the conversation altogether, and some go too far in their attempt to soften the blow. Either of these approaches can make the situation worse for the candidate and for your organization.

You have a candidate who’s trying to find a job. This is a very important life goal for this person. The sooner they know you’re not going to make a job offer, the sooner they can focus on other opportunities. You’re not helping them by procrastinating.

There is no way around the fact that this is a disappointing message for this person to receive. There are times when the message is communicated by email or some other electronic means, and there are times when it’s appropriate to do this by phone or in person. No matter the medium, be polite, be respectful, and be professional – but say as little as possible. Don’t beat around the bush. Don’t discuss the weather or last night’s game. That extends the suspense and makes it worse.

As I’m writing this, I’m visualizing a phone conversation. It might begin like this: “Hi, this is Larry Sternberg. I’m calling to let you know that we’ve decided to pursue other candidates for the position of X.” Then quit talking. You’re delivering bad news. There’s no way to change that. Most candidates will simply thank you and get off the phone. In fact, most candidates will appreciate that you called them at all. Even if you sent an email, at least you got back to them. Sadly, too many organizations don’t get back to unsuccessful candidates. The fact that you do this at all is good for your brand.

At times, a candidate wants more. He or she might ask why. Don’t respond with specifics. That takes you down the wrong road. You do not owe the candidate an answer to that question. You can simply say, “I’m not prepared to get into specifics. I know this is disappointing. I just wanted to let you know the outcome.”

Some candidates lose sight of the fact that they’re competing with others. On occasions where numerous people have applied, I’ve sometimes said, “When you apply for a job, you’re competing with everyone else who applied. On this occasion, you didn’t win the competition.” That perspective has proved helpful for many candidates.

Of course, you must convey this message in your own words, with your own style. It’s never going to be pleasant. But when you have to do it, don’t procrastinate, and don’t beat around the bush. Be polite, respectful and professional, and avoid getting into the specifics about why. If you follow these guidelines, you’ll minimize the pain for both you and the candidate.

Thanks for reading. As always I’m interested in your thoughts.

Larry Sternberg
lsternberg@talentplus.com

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